Tag Archives: attitude

Attitude, what attitude?

“The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had”

Philippians 2:5 GNB

– says Paul (in our reading of Philippians 2:1-13). This is our pattern, our example. This is the route that has been pioneered for us, and left for us to follow. Scholars suggest that Paul was adopting a hymn here. It makes no difference, for whatever follows “The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had” is going to be a hard act to follow.

There is also a question whether Paul was tactfully skating round failures in the leadership at Philippi. Were relationships there not so good? was there disunity, boasting, ambition and selfishness? The answer is not essential to our understanding. Churches are not perfect – we are a congregation of sinners. But we need to know where we are heading, and what we are supposed to imitate, how we are to work towards our goals. Again

“The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had”

Therefore . .

“Therefore . .” at the beginning of chapter 12 of Romans (we read Romans 12:1-8), Paul has completed his explanation of Christian “theory”. He will now turn to practical Christian living. But he makes it very clear that this is not detachable from what goes before. You can’t skip the first bit, because without it, this doesn’t make sense. It won’t even work.

Why is that? Surely Christianity is a very practical way of living? Yes, but it depends on God, faith, and grace. Without these, it fails. If you ask a question such as “What do I have to give God to get the thing I want?” there is no sensible answer. God doesn’t bargain. God gives generously, and includes us (if we are willing) in working for love, peace, justice . . But the good things you get are not your decision.

So – the section on practical Christian living starts with a call to be transformed. Yes, by all means be honest with God and express your hopes, desires and fears. But let the Holy Spirit get to work on you. Allow yourself to be changed, so that, gradually, you see more of God’s perspective on any situation. Don’t let yourself be bullied or manipulated into what is fashionable, or clever, or . . But look for what is good and sustainable. I don’t mean boring, or old-fashioned. There is plenty in God’s work that is exciting, creative, beautiful.

As your mind is re-shaped, (and yes, no matter how good your upbringing, we all need re-shaped minds!), look further. What gifts has God given you? There are lots of different ones, nobody has them all, but equally no Christian is left without a gift. What’s yours? Now, where does it fit in the Christian body? Paul gives a list, but there are other lists in other New Testament letters, and the wording varies, so there seems to be quite a variety. He wants to make the point that these gifts are not for “showing off”, as if believers were meant to be in competition for the “best” places. Quite the opposite, gifts are to be used for the benefit of the whole body – you use yours to help others, and need their gifts for the body to work as it should.

You can’t live as a Christian without being a Christian – because it only works if powered and directed by the Holy Spirit. Good intentions, discipline, duty – none are enough without the Spirit. That’s why the first steps involve a fundamental change of attitude, and being part of a co-operative, not competitive, group. And that is only the start!

Attitude!

Sometime one line seems to say it all. Stuck at home, bored and tired of Covid-19 restrictions? Fearful of illness, running out of money or food, or just the state of the world “afterwards”? Wondering what has happened to change everything so fast?

“The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had” – says Paul.

(That’s the Good News Bible translation of Philippians 2:5, as we read Philippians 2:5-11).

Perhaps this Holy Week you will read again the account of Jesus betrayal and death. Perhaps you will follow one of the many schemes of Bible reading, on paper or virtually on a phone or computer app. However you remember Jesus, for those who follow him, this is our pattern, our example. this is the route that has been pioneered for us, and left for us to follow.

Scholars suggest that Paul was adopting a hymn here. It makes no difference, for whatever follows “The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had” is going to be a hard act to follow.

There is also a question whether Paul was tactfully skating round failures in the leadership at Philippi. Were relationships there not so good? was there disunity, boasting, ambition and selfishness?

Again, the answer is not essential to our understanding. Churches are not perfect – we are a congregation of sinners. But we need to know where we are heading, and what we are supposed to imitate, how we are to work towards our goals. Again

“The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had”

This Holy Week we have more opportunities than any other week in the year. Please take them, even if present conditions are difficult – perhaps especially if present conditions are difficult – not to be distracted, but to think again about

“The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had”

Scripture, on and offline

Friday was wet and windy, and I stopped my car to collect a food waste bin from the middle of the road. It was clearly an odd thing to do in the rain! Very clearly – I got “looks”. People tend to assume that pleasing yourself – doing what you want to – is either a natural right, or at least something given the more senior members of a group, or perhaps those who have money to spend. But that’s a mistake!

The Christian faith teaches us that the strong – so especially those older members of the congregation, who have practised for longer – are NOT to please themselves, but to help others to build up their faith and strength. This may be less of a shock to parents and grandparents.

Look at today’s lesson Romans 15:1-6. Paul has urged the congregation not to split over minor issues – eating meat (often sacrificed in pagan temples), drinking wine, or arguing over whether or not to observe particular Jewish festivals (in a mixed Jewish-Gentile congregation). Now he says:

“We who are strong ought to put up with the failings of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Each of us must please our neighbor for the good purpose of building up the neighbor. For Christ did not please himself; but, as it is written, “The insults of those who insult you have fallen on me.”

Romans 15:1-3

Basic Christian gospel. Jesus offers us love and forgiveness, not because we deserve it, but because of his love and God’s plan. We are invited to respond, learning the same love, and finding the same HS strength.

How do we know about this?

For whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, so that by steadfastness and by the encouragement of the scriptures we might have hope.

Romans 15:4

Yes, on Bible Sunday we are sent back to the Bible. I know some of you are involved with Open the Book, and know how children enjoy and benefit from the stories. I know some of you will be involved in study groups, or follow Bible notes individually. I wonder if you have woken up to mobile phones?

  • Mine has a Bible downloaded (free!) with a daily verse
  • it also has Scripture Union Daily Bread notes
  • Morning and Evening Prayer and Compline for each day with the right readings, canticles, and a reminder of feast days + commemorations
  • and of course there are many gospel films on You Tube (+ a lot of rubbish)

The point of all this? Not getting a “qualification”. Paul lays it out clearly:

May the God of steadfastness and encouragement grant you to live in harmony with one another, in accordance with Christ Jesus, so that together you may with one voice glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. Welcome one another, therefore, just as Christ has welcomed you, for the glory of God.

Romans 15:5-7

The Christian life is tough. We are to have the attitude of Jesus, our Lord, and to draw strength from the same Holy Spirit. It won’t always be appreciated. Often it won’t even be understood – look, or rather read, what happened to him. But it is lifegiving, for us and for others. Our worship and thanksgiving are not some cold duty, but the gateway to a new and wonderful life. Together, will all our failings, we write a new chapter of God’s rescue of his people and his rebuilding of broken humanity. It’s worth being a part of.

Attitude

There is a comment on the gospel for Lent 6c titledFailure and Success” here.

“The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had:” – says Paul. (In today’s reading from Philippians 2:5-14). Having heard an account of the Passion, it strikes home even harder. This is our pattern, our example. this is the route that has been pioneered for us, and left for us to follow.

Scholars suggest that Paul was adopting a hymn here. It makes no difference, for whatever follows “The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had:” is going to be a hard act to follow. There is also a question whether Paul was tactfully skating round failures in the leadership at Philippi. Were relationships there not so good? was there disunity, boasting, ambition and selfishness? Again, the answer is not essential to our understanding. Churches are not perfect – each is a congregation of sinners. But we need to know where we are heading, and what we are supposed to imitate, how we are to work towards our goals. Again

“The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had:”

This Holy Week we have more opportunities than any other week in the year. Of course it is easy to see how things can go wrong. Of course we can see many other patterns of leadership and service. But we are committed to this difficult example. Think again:

“The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had:”

Is that better?

“Nice people don’t do things like that”.  I wonder how many of us were brought up to avoid the bad manners of childhood with such words – and grew to apply them to adult crimes.  Murder, adultery, lying for advantage are often spoken against.  Most religions forbid such things in one way or another, and the ten commandments of the Old Testament are no exception.  (See Exodus 20 and Deuteronomy 5:6-21)

In today’s gospel (Matthew 5:21-37) Jesus seems to want more.  He is not content that we should avoid the action, but reaches further for the underlying motive.  Anger, lust, and self-centredness are the problem, whether or not the opportunity for action is present.  The idea that these (and other) attitudes might be replaced by the love, justice and mercy of God is wonderful, and very demanding.

In other places, Jesus will speak words of hope that murder, adultery, fraud and bitterness (as well as their underlying attitudes) are forgivable.  But he will not suggest that the sins can be combined with the holiness of character which is important to God, and to the life of God’s people.  The disciples he gathers will not all be exemplary characters, but cannot be content with their failures. We find hope in the fact that they continue to need grace and forgiveness, if the patience needed by the community is more difficult.

So how do we hear Jesus words?  We need to deal with our anger and disrespect of other people.  It doesn’t only become offensive if we are able to hurt them physically – the attitude is already a falling short of God’s standard – a sin.  Similarly with dishonorable relationships, whether unfaithful, or simply manipulative; and words which do not tell the truth in love (as in Ephesians 4:14-16).  This is something we shall fail constantly.  Yet this standard helps us remember the difference for those of different family background and life experience.  Christians are not called to be “nice”, but to become like God in our attitudes to all sorts of people and situations.