Monthly Archives: December 2020

Ending well.

How do you “round off” a year, or a letter, or anything else for that matter? Paul seems to have understood the need for summary and suitable conclusion at the end of his letter to the Romans. (We read Romans 16:25-27 today – the very last words of the letter). Perhaps he is anticipating that it will be read as Christians gather for worship, for this has something of the feel of a service ending – and makes a very good one!

Paul is never going to be content with just repeating a convention. These words are full of thanksgiving, first for God’s ability to establish, or to make these believers strong in their faith. Of course they may need it – the life of the Christian community goes on, and will face both individual and corporate challenges. At the end of 2020, many Churches will have been shaken by the Covid pandemic, but the same God is able to strengthen us and make us stand firm.

The Christian group in Rome was “mixed”, including both Jewish believers and those of a non-Jewish background. Some of the tensions between the groups are reflected in the letter. Paul’s conclusion emphasises and summarises his point: this inclusion of both is part of the gospel message, and, though once mysterious, had been prophesied.

All of that – the argument of the letter, the working out of the gospel Paul has written to explain and proclaim, all is for the glory of God. It is not to build Paul’s reputation, let alone his wealth. It is not about the status of the faith community. It is all with the purpose of bringing glory to God through Jesus Christ. That is a challenge for every Christian and every congregation, but if it puts us in our place, it also gives us focus and hope. We are not called to “success” but to live in a way that brings glory to God.

To that we can say “Amen”, and end a chapter.

Rejoice! (properly)

How can you always be joyful? – isn’t it insensitive when suffering and tragedy abound? What if you don’t feel like it? – don’t you have a right to be miserable?

Perhaps we ought to look at the context of Paul’s words in 1 Thessalonians 5:16-24. Looking back through the letter, there has been talk of:

  • the Life and Faith of the Thessalonians
  • Paul’s Work (well, God’s really); his desire to visit again
  • and in chapter 4, the consequences: A Life that Pleases God

What does God want? – well, very much what we want in our better moments: Love, peace, mutual service, holiness of life. So if they, and we, have absorbed that, we should be Ready. Ready for – The Lord’s Coming. And the words we read today are at the end of chapter 5 and the letter.

So “Be joyful always, pray at all times, be thankful in all circumstances”. It’s not insensitive in context. Don’t “bounce” on the miserable – but help put their problems in context. Face death in the context of resurrection, pain and hurt in the context of incarnation and healing.

No, you don’t have a right to be miserable! All you have is given by God (sometimes spoiled by your misuse – but there is forgiveness). At least some sorts of misery imply that God isn’t up to his job – he’s given the wrong tools, doesn’t understand, doesn’t know. (Yes, there are other sorts of misery. We can all be overcome for a time by tragedy, and cannot offer an easy solution to mental illness, but – do I have a right to choose to be miserable, NO, as far as it is a choice, I don’t).

Be joyful. How, if I don’t feel it? By giving thanks, by not restraining the Holy Spirit, by avoiding evil. This isn’t a forced Hollywood smile, a backslapping heartiness, or the suggestion that real Christians must be extravert personalities. But it is a serious instruction.

“Be joyful always, pray at all times, be thankful in all circumstances.” Joy, even at times of difficulty, is a blessing. Thanksgiving can be carefully practised until it becomes a habit. So – Praise God! not as a cliché, but as a deliberate decision, especially at times of stress. Thank God! even when you have to think quite hard what you can thank him for.

The lives the Thessalonian Christians led were certainly no easier, more comfortable or more secure than ours, – perhaps they needed these instructions, but so do we. As a preparation for the coming of Jesus, and as a serious part of our faith, let’s set out to do this:

“Be joyful always, pray at all times, be thankful in all circumstances. This is what God wants from you in your life in union with Christ Jesus.”

1 Th 5:16-18

Urgent Patience.

I suppose many of us wander between enthusiasms. Earlier this year climate crisis was in the news and attracting our attention (quite rightly!). Then the Covid pandemic edged it out of our attention, and now the possibilities of a vaccine feature alongside the varying estimates of what Christmas will be like.

The thought of Christmas might remind us that we aren’t yet ready. Present planning, card sending, and arranging family meetings are one thing, being ready for the coming of Jesus another. This pre-Christmas season of Advent is not just about preparing a celebration of Jesus’ birth, but of reminding ourselves of the promise that he will return, bringing an end to the world we know, with judgement, accountability, and the full arrival of the Kingdom he began on earth.

As we read 2 Peter 3:8-15, we are reminded not to get impatient. If some Christians in Peter’s time expected Jesus return rapidly, they needed to remember that the delay allowed time for repentance to some who needed it – and God was wanting to see them saved. We face the same temptation – “Will anything ever change? Don’t I just need to fit in with the way things are in the world around?”, with a firm answer that it is not the people around us who set our ambitions and standards, but God. The whole idea of Jesus return, and our readiness to give an account of our lives, and our use of all God’s gifts, is important and has an urgency – we are not promised any further warnings!

The urgency is real – this needs to be a priority now, not “when I get around to it” or “when life is less busy”. At the same time, we need patience. God does not have to explain the timing to us. If Jesus’ return happens after the end our our life, we have no complaint. Quite the opposite, we will have had more time to practise, more time to see the benefits and blessings of a life lived as a disciple, learning the ways of love and faithfulness. More time to advertise and recommend them. There is no place for panic, or frantic confusion. What we need is, yes, urgent patience. Urgent – being ready must be a priority, and move to the top of the “to do” list, but patience, to take time to learn, to repent, and to go on repenting and reforming all the areas the Holy Spirit highlights for our prayerful attention.