Tag Archives: leadership

Fireworks

We like to do well, and to encourage others – celebrating family and friends’ achievements. But we can overdo it! A proper ambition can become stressful competition of the most unhelpful sort. What to one person is friendly rivalry and motivation is to another a load of expectation and the fear of failure.

Paul had a problem with the church in Corinth (2 Corinthians 12:2-10). He found that they were preferring to listen to other teachers, whose example was harmfully competitive, perhaps with a financial motive. His reaction is not to enter the competition, but to “boast”. There seems no doubt that “the man” who had the revelations he talks about is himself, but he prefers to boast about his weakness, so that he can focus on the strength God supplies.

This may seem remote from our experience, yet it has importance. On the one hand, we are warned against being competitive in telling stories of our religious experience. There is no merit in “experiences” unless they lead on to a changed character, and a life of faithful and effective service – and that can be seen without publicity. At the same time, we are reminded of God’s help, to provide what is needed (yes, not always what we want, or even think we need!). The focus should be on God, not on self-dramatisation.

On the other hand, those who choose Christian leaders, whether deciding which group to join, or which person gets a job, need to beware. The qualities that matter do not include an inflated sense of self-importance, nor stories of dramatic spiritual experience. If there is faith, the experience will show in gifts and character. If there is only a desire for excitement or the unusual, there is danger.

Attitude

Sometimes it is easy to get caught up in the background to a passage, like Philippians 2:5-11. Is Paul quoting a poem or hymn – and what difference would that make if it was true? Does that mean he agrees with every word, or is he just using something his readers already know to drive home a main point? Even more tantalising, is this a piece of encouraging teaching, or a gentle rebuke to leaders who are getting too competitive, or status conscious, or just proud of their position and achievements?

A little thought brings us back to the point, or perhaps points. “have the same mindset as Christ Jesus”, or as the Good News Bible puts it, “The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had”. Does it matter if Paul is quoting another writer? No, these words have to be taken seriously whoever the original human author was. And it is important we consider the words and what they have to say about Jesus, especially if in the next few days we will think again about his Passion and Death. That attitude? That readiness to endure quietly, to give in such an extreme way?

We could find it easier to speculate about whether this is encouragement or rebuke for the Philippian church leaders. We know our churches are not perfect, consisting as they do of sinners who may be forgiven, but are not yet sorted out. No doubt that was true of first century Philippi, too. But the question rebounds when we have the courage to ask of ourselves, “Can you take encouragement here? Does this help to heal wounds you have?”. After that, we may be able to face, “Do you understand the need to follow this lead, to repent of complacency, pride, failure to give the right lead?”

Of course, we may recognise that we are being told that it is not all about us. There is a focus here on Christ, the humble, victorious Christ. Do we need to redirect our focus, to find a centre there. Faith is not in ourselves, nor should we allow it to be re-defined as self-help, life coaching, or any other sort of egocentric rebranding.

“The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had”. I have a lot of work to do on that, but I can understand where the goal is.