Tag Archives: Bible

Scripture, on and offline

Friday was wet and windy, and I stopped my car to collect a food waste bin from the middle of the road. It was clearly an odd thing to do in the rain! Very clearly – I got “looks”. People tend to assume that pleasing yourself – doing what you want to – is either a natural right, or at least something given the more senior members of a group, or perhaps those who have money to spend. But that’s a mistake!

The Christian faith teaches us that the strong – so especially those older members of the congregation, who have practised for longer – are NOT to please themselves, but to help others to build up their faith and strength. This may be less of a shock to parents and grandparents.

Look at today’s lesson Romans 15:1-6. Paul has urged the congregation not to split over minor issues – eating meat (often sacrificed in pagan temples), drinking wine, or arguing over whether or not to observe particular Jewish festivals (in a mixed Jewish-Gentile congregation). Now he says:

“We who are strong ought to put up with the failings of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Each of us must please our neighbor for the good purpose of building up the neighbor. For Christ did not please himself; but, as it is written, “The insults of those who insult you have fallen on me.”

Romans 15:1-3

Basic Christian gospel. Jesus offers us love and forgiveness, not because we deserve it, but because of his love and God’s plan. We are invited to respond, learning the same love, and finding the same HS strength.

How do we know about this?

For whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, so that by steadfastness and by the encouragement of the scriptures we might have hope.

Romans 15:4

Yes, on Bible Sunday we are sent back to the Bible. I know some of you are involved with Open the Book, and know how children enjoy and benefit from the stories. I know some of you will be involved in study groups, or follow Bible notes individually. I wonder if you have woken up to mobile phones?

  • Mine has a Bible downloaded (free!) with a daily verse
  • it also has Scripture Union Daily Bread notes
  • Morning and Evening Prayer and Compline for each day with the right readings, canticles, and a reminder of feast days + commemorations
  • and of course there are many gospel films on You Tube (+ a lot of rubbish)

The point of all this? Not getting a “qualification”. Paul lays it out clearly:

May the God of steadfastness and encouragement grant you to live in harmony with one another, in accordance with Christ Jesus, so that together you may with one voice glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. Welcome one another, therefore, just as Christ has welcomed you, for the glory of God.

Romans 15:5-7

The Christian life is tough. We are to have the attitude of Jesus, our Lord, and to draw strength from the same Holy Spirit. It won’t always be appreciated. Often it won’t even be understood – look, or rather read, what happened to him. But it is lifegiving, for us and for others. Our worship and thanksgiving are not some cold duty, but the gateway to a new and wonderful life. Together, will all our failings, we write a new chapter of God’s rescue of his people and his rebuilding of broken humanity. It’s worth being a part of.

Truth

The Bible is old. It comes from a very different time and culture, and needs translating from dead languages. Why bother? You will not expect me either to apologise for using the Bible, or for finding it important. But “Why bother?” is a significant question, and I’ll take just one of many possible answers.

Paul tells Timothy (I’m reading 2 Timothy 3:14 – 4:5) it is useful for teaching the truth. Truth – an important thing. Without it, we get lost, in “fake news”, opinion, misinformation, propaganda, “spin”. The first thing to do before making any plans is to check the facts. It doesn’t matter if you are planning a bus trip to town or a lifetime career. You need to know the possibilities – bus times, educational requirements . . The more you think about it, the more important truth becomes:

  • Truth is the way things are and while you can live in a dream or a fantasy, it doesn’t work for long, and you can come down with a bump.
  • Truth is reality and we all learn about the realities – financial realities, medical realities, educational realities . .
  • Truth is a foundation. Actually, the only foundation with any reliability. You can build on truth – a career, a relationship, a plan of where to go from here . .

Truth is less common than it used to be. There used to be a standard, which required truth, for example in courts, and in public life. Now, that is more “negotiable”. It should make Christians more visible. The Bible tells us about God, and it may be memories of bad school lessons that make us forget one of the best things about God is Truth. God doesn’t do lies, not even half lies; he’s as straight as you can get. He so much “tells it as it is”, that he is not only true, but Truth – he defines the word. (Remember Jesus, “I am Way, Truth and Life” John 14:6 ?). Of course, this isn’t “true” just because somebody says so. You need to decide this for yourself, in the most careful and reliable way you can – but don’t delay!

And when you find out for yourself, lets celebrate the God of the Bible, with a determination to get to know him better, understanding that truth is a firm basis for:

  • a life
  • a career
  • a relationship
  • and anything else you had in mind (anything good, that is!)

Scripture

At the beginning of John 5 Jesus heals a man who has been ill for 38 years – but his carrying away his mat on the Sabbath starts an argument. How can Jesus be right if he encourages the breaking of Sabbath law and tradition?  The reading for Bible Sunday started at John 5:30 and Jesus says in effect, “You don’t want to listen to what I say?, OK listen to the witnesses in my case, and there are 4”:

  1. verse 33  John the Baptist
  2. verse 36 Jesus’ actions – his healing and other miracles
  3. verse 37 God the Father (but he passes over this – God is not
    well enough known)
  4. verse 39 Scripture

The implication is clear enough. There is all the evidence needed to understand Jesus, and to understand is to follow and obey.

If we come into this Century, you will see that we get most of that
through the bible: Jesus’ words and actions, the account of John the
Baptist, and the Old Testament which Jesus referred his opponents to as scripture.

For us, scripture is enormously important. When I show children the church, I point out: the eagle lectern – to hold a Bible for reading, and the pulpit, for explaining what is read, and the altar, for the eucharist we are told in the Bible to do for Jesus.

But I don’t want anyone to make scripture into a magic charm – I
want you to use it! It’s not meant to be illustrated and elegantly
bound and left alone. It is meant to become part of our lives, in
dialogue with our ambitions, our habits and our lifestyle. What does that mean?

We read of John the Baptist, and those who spoke and acted against him – and hear today’s conflicting views of right/wrong, necessary/helpful/out of date. The answers we need are found in a continuing dialogue between what we do and scripture, so that God gets a say, as well as us.  We read of Jesus miracles, teaching, sacrifice. What does that do for a busy week in my life? There needs to be a dialogue, putting one alongside the other, letting both speak.

We read of scripture explaining Jesus’ role to Jews – and recognise far more as we have the New Testament as well as the Old Testament Jesus spoke of. But his complaint was that they didn’t apply it, and missed the point. It’s learning to apply scripture that is vital.

And we still have to deal with God the Father. Perhaps Jesus was referring to the resurrection (still in future). It’s not “put your faith in a book the academics can’t agree on”. Its “use the bible to question and direct your life, and let there be a two way discussion. Check the results with God in prayer – and with the experience of living them.

There are many ways of letting the Bible read you; there are audio recordings and books, software, e-mails, and many schemes. However you do it, give scripture a place in your routine, and start a dialogue between the Bible and daily reality. Each will bring the other to life – and the results can be everlasting!

Bible

“Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away” says Jesus as part of the Bible Sunday gospel (Matthew 24:30-35).  But what is the significance of that? Context is important. You may remember that the Bible says “There is no God” – but you do need to look at where, and what it means.  The whole quote is better ‘Fools say to themselves, “There is no God!” ‘ Psalm 14:1, and 53:1

So what is the context here? This text comes from a chapter about persecution, the destruction of Jerusalem, and the final judgement. Each of the first three gospels has a similar section, and in each it is difficult to separate the parts about the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans in 70 AD from the parts about the final judgement at the end of time.

This text is important to both: “Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away”. Christians needed to know in the first century, when everything was falling apart in their world, that God was faithful and reliable. In the twenty-first century we also need to know that.

But we might ask, which words matter? Three things come from scripture:

  • We need to know a simple statement of gospel: Because of God’s love and Jesus’ death, there is life, forgiveness and hope for any and all who will admit their failure and need, and turn to Jesus’ Way. (its not the precise words that matter, but the message)
  • Secondly, the words which describe what it means to live as a disciple ( / follower / student) of Jesus. The stories which tell us what he is working at, and how we need to learn, obey, and relate to one another . . Words to guide us in Christian life are valuable.
  • And particularly from this passage, we might add as part of that, words of support for hard times and tight corners. Jesus insists that God will “gather his chosen people” 24:31 at the end. Or you might think of promises about not being alone, of your prayer being heard, or of not being tested beyond the possibility of resistance. These are important words of scripture, but they need to be known and understood. Exaggeration will lead to disappointment and disillusion; ignorance to despair; right hearing will equip and encourage us for life.

Again, you may remember that Jesus quotes Deuteronomy (Old Testament scripture) to the devil in the wilderness – and the devil also quotes or rather misquotes scripture – context and meaning matter!

“Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away” says Jesus Matthew 24.35. We must understand, from the context and comparison of text with text, what is meant. Then we are equipped.