Tag Archives: rebuke

Attitude

Sometimes it is easy to get caught up in the background to a passage, like Philippians 2:5-11. Is Paul quoting a poem or hymn – and what difference would that make if it was true? Does that mean he agrees with every word, or is he just using something his readers already know to drive home a main point? Even more tantalising, is this a piece of encouraging teaching, or a gentle rebuke to leaders who are getting too competitive, or status conscious, or just proud of their position and achievements?

A little thought brings us back to the point, or perhaps points. “have the same mindset as Christ Jesus”, or as the Good News Bible puts it, “The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had”. Does it matter if Paul is quoting another writer? No, these words have to be taken seriously whoever the original human author was. And it is important we consider the words and what they have to say about Jesus, especially if in the next few days we will think again about his Passion and Death. That attitude? That readiness to endure quietly, to give in such an extreme way?

We could find it easier to speculate about whether this is encouragement or rebuke for the Philippian church leaders. We know our churches are not perfect, consisting as they do of sinners who may be forgiven, but are not yet sorted out. No doubt that was true of first century Philippi, too. But the question rebounds when we have the courage to ask of ourselves, “Can you take encouragement here? Does this help to heal wounds you have?”. After that, we may be able to face, “Do you understand the need to follow this lead, to repent of complacency, pride, failure to give the right lead?”

Of course, we may recognise that we are being told that it is not all about us. There is a focus here on Christ, the humble, victorious Christ. Do we need to redirect our focus, to find a centre there. Faith is not in ourselves, nor should we allow it to be re-defined as self-help, life coaching, or any other sort of egocentric rebranding.

“The attitude you should have is the one that Christ Jesus had”. I have a lot of work to do on that, but I can understand where the goal is.

Normal

You might think it strange that the Sunday after Christmas we read of Jesus as a 12 year old. (Luke 2:41-52), but it makes clear that Christmas is no “baby story”. The baby grows to a normal youngster, here on the edge of adult status.

There is a play on words when Mary and Joseph catch up with Jesus in the temple. His mother speaks of her anxious search with “your father” – as Joseph was in many ways. Yet Jesus speaks of “my father’s house”, meaning the temple, and God. Jesus has come to know who he is, and to recognise God for himself. It does not mean that he rejects his human family, nor the need for obedience to them. Nor was he teaching in the temple – he was listening, though his questions were full of insight.

This is our only glimpse of the story between the visit of the Wise Men and the start of Jesus’ public ministry. It shows a real child, though one in whom there is a growing understanding of a special status and purpose. It reminds us that the one who comes into our world is God, and also fully human.

It is also important in reminding us that the Son of God has, in his perfect humanity, to be obedient, and submit to those who do not understand as he does. If he was hurt by the rubuke and frustrated by their lack of understanding, it is not made the excuse for an argument, still less for abandoning his family. It is not always easy for people who understand to do that.