Tag Archives: second coming

Fair Warning

An aerial photograph gives us a different point of view – we see things we know in a new way, and the pattern as well. Today’s gospel (Luke 21:25-36 – today on Advent Sunday we start a new “year”, with Luke as our main gospel) may seem taken from a strange angle: Jesus is talking, and finishing comments started with the warning that the Temple in Jerusalem would be destroyed.

Jesus talks about three things in the future (though for Luke 1 or perhaps 2 are past):

  • Pentecost –  21:32 seems to be about that
  • The Destruction of Jerusalem – in AD 70, by the Romans (including the destruction of the temple)
  • Jesus return in glory at the end of time.

Each of these is important: Pentecost as the arrival of the Holy Spirit; the destruction of Jerusalem, because Jesus saw it coming and the Christians seem to have taken the hint and escaped.

But the idea of Jesus coming back is even more important. Why should we take notice? Because it will happen when many people don’t expect it. And it will come when sin has run, apparently unchecked, to mislead many people. Finally, sin meets God. The Lord comes back to take charge, and hear the account his people give.

It is possible to get lost in this. Some Christians will want you to consider whether descriptions like verse 25 do not correspond to global warming, or the space programme , or … (There have always been those convinced that the end was just around the corner – but we are not called to speculation.)

Some people will find the idea of judgement a suggestion of a religion of fear and repression – but no, it is good news, and no threat to those who will heed the warning. We are told in general what will happen – disorder, wickedness, desertion – so that we are not taken in, but remain faithful and alert. And that’s the point. Jesus warned his disciples what was coming so that they would be prepared.

Pentecost has come; the Roman Empire has long gone. We don’t know when Jesus will return – Tuesday afternoon, or a few more millenia. So don’t be surprised if the world is a mess; don’t be misled by those who say God doesn’t notice and his standards are out of date an unenforcable; be alert, be ready to welcome Jesus whenever he comes; and pray for wisdom in the meantime.

Ready? (Advent 1a)

Some years ago I had a car accident. I was driving home in busy traffic when, without warning, there was a thump – a boy had run out and been hit by my car. I stopped, jumped out, was relieved to see him getting up, but made him wait to be checked by ambulance paramedics. Thankfully, he was OK – shocked (a nasty colour 5 minutes later, and very shaky), bruised. Police came, breathylised me and took a statement, then talked to the boy, and his friends. When they had done all that, they said it would probably be OK – the boys had been chasing one another, and it was an accident. Relief!

I had to go and take my licence and insurance to be examined at a police station. I found my licence, looked for the insurance. It wasn’t in the file, so I rang up the company. It was my wife’s car, and the insurance rolled over year by year automatically – but her bank card had been renewed, and the old one had not paid. No insurance! That’s a criminal offence. I went and reported, feeling terrible. I anticipated being called to court – and reported in the press “Vicar sentenced . .”

It took me an uncomfortable week to realise that while I was driving my wife’s uninsured car, my car was insured. And that insurance covered me to drive another car! Straight back to the police station. Relief! Life began again.

With Advent Sunday, we begin a new Church year, – you’ll see the gospel readings coming mainly from Matthew (it was Luke until last Sunday). We focus on the coming of Jesus – but today, the Second Coming. Not the baby of Bethlehem, but the return in power of the Son of God at the end of the world.  Our readings are full of it – Matthew 24. 36-44, Romans 13. 11-14

We are told it will be unexpected, -that many will be caught unprepared. There is a strong implication that it will then be too late to put things right. Judgement will follow, and as Christians we are warned to be ready  – ready to give an account of ourselves, our lives, our stewardship of all that God has given us, materially and spiritually.

Judgement does not mean God is hostile and wanting to punish. Think if you like of being seen as you really are. Think of how I felt, facing prosecution for driving without insurance! Yes, that was unintended, and accidental – but if the accident had been more serious, my insurance might have been needed to provide continuing treatment and care for a casualty. I would have been mortified to be exposed as failing to provide what the law required. I was so relieved to be – accidentally – not guilty.

Judgement is real. Everything we are, everything we do, everything we want, will be known – with all the reasons, and none of the excuses!

Do check your car insurance!
Do check your life is ready for examination in detail, without notice. The Son of God will return – it could be thousands of years after we die, or Tuesday afternoon. We don’t know, we are just told to be ready.