Tag Archives: recognition

It’s so good!

What will heaven be like? John’s vision (today we read Revelation 21:10 and 21:22 – 22:5) has some interesting things, which ring true. We read of the centering of everything on God, Father and Son, and the way they provide light. Although strange at first, it is something significant. It is the light of God that has shown us the way, and will do so in future. It is light that makes possible free movement, and comfort, and recognition of people and places. As we fumble in a power cut, and shiver in an eclipse, we enjoy a sunny day. How much more joyful the light of God, which is more than physical.

We sometimes speak of “security lights” – those annoying lamps with sensors to turn them on, usually not quite when you want them. In heaven, the illumination is effective; there is no need to shut the city gates (usually a night-time security measure). Similarly it is a good place, where there is no “bad behaviour” or attempt to deceive. There is, not just a negative safety, but a positive thriving.

The opening verses of chapter 22 speak of the river, recalling Ezekiel’s vision (Ezekiel 47:1-12), bringing life to dry places. Here too the tree of life gives life and healing – for the goodness and holiness of God seems to be almost infectious. On earth we are used to the way viruses and evil spread. We sometimes forget that love, joy, hope and many Christian fruit are seen, and that witness will also spread on earth.

The reign that continues for ever is not one of conquest or colonisation, but the good order, transparent justice, and continuing healing of all in the city. It is no wonder that God is worshipped, and we are encouraged to join in, even in anticipation from where we are now.

But first . .

Procrastination – displacement activity. It’s a wonderful way of avoiding doing what is necessary or important by – doing something else. I suspect most of us have done it, and know a good deal about how it feels. Mark (Mark 9:30-37) tells us that Jesus is trying to teach the disciples about (9.31) his betrayal, death and resurrection.  But it is not going in. Instead, they talk about who is most important. Actually, they argue. I suppose it did have some importance – in a difficult situation, who would be the leader? (But the answer is Jesus).

Instead, this is surely what James was talking about. (You may read James 3:13-4:8 as an additional reading.  This is 3.16: “Where there is jealousy and selfishness, there is also disorder and every kind of evil.” It is a case of fights and quarrels rather than good lives showing good deeds, humility and wisdom.

Jesus needs to make a point, and takes a child. Remember that in New Testament times children were not idolised, spoiled and pampered. They were unimportant. So Jesus teaches that the concern for status, rank and recognition has to go in those who would be his disciples. Their reaction is not recorded. Did they understand? Did they agree? It would be fascinating to know – and would distract us nicely from asking if we have understood, and agreed.

I wonder what you think is the greatest single problem faced by Christians today? Militant atheism, political marginalisation, too little money, too few clergy or too many buildings? I don’t think it is any of these things. I suggest that the greatest problem for Christians today is exactly what the disciples had difficulty with in that reading. Jesus was trying to teach them something important, but they couldn’t hear that, and found other things to argue about. We find it difficult to learn, we easily get distracted and make too much of personalities.

The Church has plenty of people, leaders, money, resources – it is the problem of using them to meet the needs (as God sees them, now). You may find it easier to hear from James, whose first readers may have been tempted to revolution as a means of being most important. James is clear that conflict driven by jealousy or a desire for “position” is out; good deeds and humility are the wise – and Godly – way. Or look again at Jesus, becoming a rather lonely figure as the gospel moves on. He will not be distracted from the road to Jerusalem and the Cross. Of course there are thousands of other things he could do – sort out the discples for a start. But he is clear what is important, he has heard, and will go humbly to do what is needed.

I’d like to do the same, but first . .