Tag Archives: Peter

Fired up?

What motivates you? gets you out of bed on a cold morning? The fear that somebody will come and get you? Habit and the need to get to work and pay the bills? It works better if there is something positive to look forward to, something good which can be enjoyed and shared.

Peter is looking forward to Christ’s return, (we read 2 Peter 1:16-21 ) and arguing against those who doubt it. You may remember how he started with Jesus – found by his brother, called from his fishing. It started as some sort of interest, helped by a group who lived together and became friends. But that wasn’t enough.

The key was Jesus. Even then, it was not a striking personality, nor a wonderful teaching or programme. What he talks about is the greatness he saw, especially when Jesus was Transfigured. That was quite an experience – but Peter’s faith wasn’t built on an “experience”. It was a time when everything came together, and he “saw” it, and understood – and that would motivate him through dark and difficult times.

What did he see? A glimpse of reality. A reality in which God is involved with his creation, and so everything is seen in a new light. A glimpse of holiness, of Jesus talking with 2 great leaders for God about what was truly important, about something which would have significance for ever. A glimpse of heavenly beings, in communication which had understanding and purpose.

Peter sees, and his confidence grows in the one identified as God’s Son, and he moves on. He draws attention to the message of the prophets verse 19, and the need to be guided by the Holy Spirit verse 21.

We read this passage before Lent, to remind us that it is not just a time to give up some trivial indulgence, and enjoy being miserable. It is time to think about our motivation, what feeds it and what obstructs it. Some motivations in Christian life just don’t work – and we see people give up.

Against that we set, not some subjective experience, but the greatness and glory of God revealed in Jesus. We may come to understand at different times, but we also need to know about

  • the reality
  • the holiness
  • and the communication

so that we set out on our journey to heaven with determination, and energy, and skill.

It may be that you know how to sort out your motivation; or perhaps you just need to listen to people like Peter, writing to convince you.

Telling the story

How would you tell the story of Jesus? Or, for somebody who knew parts of it, but not the significance, how would you order it? These are important questions if faith is to reach two or even three lost generations in the West. Acts 10 tells the story of Peter’s visit to the non-Jewish Cornelius, and the section we read today (Acts 10:34-43) covers what he said to the gathered household.

First, he does not confuse the issue with his own feelings. The event is of enormous importance to Peter, as he goes takes the message of Jesus outside the Jewish world for the first time. (Read Acts 10:9-17 to understand something of the struggle it involved). Yet his two verses of explanation (vv33,34) are directed to explain his presence to his audience, not to chart his own journey and new insight!

Secondly, Peter makes clear that God’s message is about Jesus, and delivered through the events of Jesus’ life. There is reference to the events at his Baptism (also read today), but verses 39-41 go straight to the death and resurrection. This is central to Christian faith, and Peter wastes no time in making that clear.

His stress on the importance of Jesus, and the corresponding lack of self-importance, or demands for institutional affiliation, are also a great help in the search for unity among Christians. Faith is shared by those who follow Jesus as Lord. They have a variety of leaders, organisations, and traditions – some of lasting value, but none of these are definitive. When we tell the story of Jesus, it is not to increase attendance at our preferred place or worship, or to add donors to its finances, but to share the faith which brings life and hope. New believers may “join” other groups – but we must rejoice if they are joined to the faithful!

If Peter spoke along these lines – it seems likely this is a summary, and he used more words than are written here – we should notice how effective this was. Verses 44-48 show the power of God breaking out, reminding us that the Holy Spirit is not under control. (This is one time when the Spirit came before Baptism with water). It doesn’t need a great speaker to manipulate an audience; a humble person who will tell the story of Jesus as something of importance can release the power of God to help and heal.

If you wonder how to tell the story of Jesus, make sure it is just that – the story of Jesus life, death and resurrection. For those who come to believe, expect God’s power to show in changing lives – but lives that change in God’s agenda, not yours or that of your congregation!

Can we go back now?

(for some reason, Easter 3c gospel was missed three years ago, so here is:

“Can we go back now?” You’ve just started a long walk, or you’re 10 minutes into a day’s shopping, when a little voice asks: “Can we go back now?”. But it’s not only children. Grown ups get nostalgic: we long for the “good old days”, for the time when we were young, for school or student friends, above all, for the time when the world sang our tune.

So (in John 21:1-19) – the disciples go fishing. They don’t like sitting around, they don’t like not knowing, they like fishing. It’s what they know, it’ll get them out of the house, they can do something useful … But it’s not the same, and when Jesus meets them early in the morning, there’s nothing to show for a night’s work. They’d forgotten that other time that Luke told in his gospel [chapter 5], when they fished all night, caught nothing, and Jesus showed them where to find the fish – which they caught in such numbers that they nearly sank! That had been when Peter really started with Jesus.

This time again, Jesus shows he knows what he’s talking about. Once again they share a meal with him; many of those shared meals had been important – not just the Last Supper in Jerusalem. After the meal, Jesus calls Peter again – but it’s a different Peter now. This isn’t the “grown up” swaggering, boastful Peter. He’s grown down, deflated, with less mouth and more ear. It’s not an easy chat they have, walking along the beach. But now Peter knows there’s no going back – and its not just fishing that he’s giving up, the old Peter is gone, whatever replaces him.

So what about your attitude to faith and Church? Be clear it is not for a reminder of the “good old days”, a nostalgic trip to when we were young, and things were proper. As Peter and John discovered, there’s no going back, things are different now. No, this is no trip down memory lane. We go forward with the power of Jesus’ Resurrection, and his commission to evangelise and serve. We are all committed to a new life, and to living it with joy and thanksgiving.

Lifechanging

Simon was a fisherman on the Sea of Galilee. We don’t know a great deal about his earlier life, but he appears in a story about Jesus as the owner of a fishing boat which will be very useful. Jesus asks if, by putting the boat a little distance on the lake, Simon will help him speak to a large number of people without interruption (and with his voice carrying better over the water). Luke 5:1-11.

Simon agrees. We don’t know if he is just being helpful, or how much he agrees with what is being said. I sometimes imagine that he saw himself as the practical man helping a good, but rather “other worldly”, teacher.

But then the teacher and carpenter shows the fisherman how to fish! Something about that unlikely catch deeply affects Simon. His relationship with Jesus is changed. He is committed – perhaps not even knowing clearly yet the terms of his commitment. Now he is “with” Jesus. He will be a disciple, learning all his master can teach. Fishing, family and anything else will have to take second place.

What happened to Simon has been repeated in different ways many times. Jesus attracts interest, by his actions and his teaching. Some are impressed, others entertained. Then there are those of us who come, in a sudden move or a slower development, to accept a different and unequal relationship. Jesus is Lord – in charge – and we are disciples, learners under instruction. We don’t stop thinking, asking questions, working through doubts and misunderstandings. But there is a commitment, and it takes first importance.

No doubt people have to start by relating to Jesus in different ways. Some may want to try and patronise his teaching, or to suggest that we would now develop it differently, or improve on some details . . But Christian faith is not defined by starting from Jesus ideas, but by accepting Jesus as Lord – having the authority of God come to us in human life, being the only one to set us free, and to shape our freedom in a way of life lived to his glory.

Simon seems to have found it confusing at first. But that day’s decision shaped his life in a way he never turned back from.

Go on listening!

I like to be right, so I can Identify with Peter in Mark 8:27-38. And Peter is; Jesus is the Messiah, and it is a terrific discovery. A high mid-point of Mark’s gospel; you can feel the excitement. And in the middle of it, Peter stops listening. He doesn’t hear – doesn’t want to, can’t ? – Jesus talk about suffering. If he had gone on, what a disaster that would have been! But Jesus doesn’t let him.

It’s easy to stop listening. I might even have done it myself. But I notice other people doing it much more easily. Perhaps you have seen it too? Someone learns “God is love”. That’s great, true and important. But then they stop listening. If God is love (and it says so in 1John 4:8 (& 16)), then God must do whatever I think is loving? And they find out he doesn’t, and get hurt and confused, because they have stopped listening. God is love, but he defines what that means and how it works, and we need to go on listening and learning to find out.

Jesus is the Messiah – the great King long expected by Jews because of Old Testament prophecy. But if Peter thinks that means he will take over, throw out the Romans, and give him an honoured, easy and rewarding place in the new government – forget it! Peter will find it hard to learn that the Messiah is also the Servant Isaiah talked about – the Suffering Servant. I think I find that hard, too. I know what it means in theory, but theory isn’t enough.

It’s much easier to preach, or hear: “Jesus is King of the Universe; once you follow him as his disciple your life will sort out and work better”.  That’s true, and important too. But somehow it is easier to say and hear than the next bit:

“Jesus teaches his disciples what it means to serve; it is sometimes difficult, embarrassing, or even painful. You may not always understand what he is planning, or why you have to play a particular part.” That’s also true, and important – but it doesn’t have quite the Wow factor. It is still worthwhile, not only because it forwards God’s plan and the Kingdom on earth, but also because it helps you grow, develop in faith and love and holiness, and be what you are meant to be. It’s just not quite so – marketable.

So you might like to think about 2 things from this gospel:

  • Jesus is the Messiah –  the greatest King ever, Ruler of the Universe; but he sets about that in a new and strange way to serve us and free us.
  • Secondly, don’t stop listening to God. Especially when you think you know what’s coming next, or you make some new discovery. You know that Christians keep making mistakes? Remember that they get away with it by keeping listening and following instructions to put things right. It’s very simple.

Peter got it right. Jesus is the Messiah. But it wasn’t a theory test; he had to keep listening to work out properly what it meant. So do we.

For example – Peter

Peter’s great recognition of Jesus as the long-promised and expected King (Messiah) is a turning point in each of the first three gospels (Matthew 16:13-20).  It brings into the open – though only for the disciples at first – the most important truth.  For us, who sometimes think “Christ” is Jesus surname, we wonder at the significance.  (Christ is actually the Greek form of the Hebrew “Messiah”, literally anointed one, so King).

We might see its importance for us by looking at Peter.  Peter was a tough fisherman, who took time to take Jesus seriously, and then personally. Luke tells us how (Luke 5:1-10), after Peter lent his boat for Jesus to preach from, a big catch of fish taken by following Jesus’ instructions led to Peter’s admission of sin and failure. Jesus doesn’t go away as Peter suggests, but commissions him as a fisher of men.  Freed from the guilt of his past failure, Peter is also freed from being “just a Galilean fisherman”. He becomes a leader of apostles.

Many Christians have found the freedom of faith liberated them. Some were aware that guilt crippled them, and forgiveness made new life possible. Others concentrated more on the acceptance and dignity that God gave to lives lived in difficult or demanding circumstances. No one else might know or care what happened to them, but if God did, they could walk on, and walk tall.

Peter’s trust in Jesus wasn’t just an escape from guilt and a limited life. It brought his a freedom to serve.  At Caesarea Philippi, he recognises Jesus as the promised Messiah, the fulfilment of what the OT looked forward to – and he has the courage to say it.  (Of course, he hasn’t become infallible – his next line will be mistakenly telling Jesus that he doesn’t need to suffer!).  This is the pivot of the gospel because it makes clear that Jesus is Lord.  Not just a teacher, explaining a theory, nor just a miracle worker.

Again, after Jesus Resurrection and Ascension, Peter has seen James arrested and executed.  But he is set free by an angel (Acts 12:1-12). He won’t escape execution for ever, but he has years of service to give first, travelling, teaching, telling the world about Jesus.

Perhaps the freedom to serve is something we are not so good at.  We want to be free from things that limit and diminish us, but are not so good at understanding what use to make of our freedom. Peter shows us how a life in Jesus’ service might indeed be the intended use of freedom.  If the picture we get from Peter is freedom from sin, guilt and the limitations of a small life, it is also of freedom to serve, grow, and for him to be a leader and pioneer.  Peter is a good example of Christian life!