Tag Archives: looking forward

What about Creation?

Creation is wonderful! If you doubt it, think how many different people would be fascinated, within their speciality:

  • Engineers of all sorts are fascinated by the order, and interlocking systems balancing
  • Anthropologists and Zoologists can spend lifetimes studying the diversity and intricacy of what they discover – knowing there is much more
  • Astronomers get excited by things I don’t understand at all!
  • Authors are amazed by the varieties of human experience, or travel possibilities.
  • Artists look at landscapes, from postcard sunsets to subtle delights

I try to take photographs, and have a continuing series of clouds. Sometimes with skyline, often without. There is colour, shape, contrast, mystery, power . . all sorts of things, often in great beauty.

Yes, creation is wonderful but – read Romans 8:18-25 as we did, and we need to look forward. We know there are various things wrong. Climate Change has been highlighted as a concern for us all. But there are other problems: trade imbalances impoverishing the weak; technological changes affecting cultures. . Paul is not very specific, but seems to say that creation groans, and that humans, including Christians, also experience less than the ideal. This isn’t it – we haven’t arrived.

These and other problems don’t mean creation is wholly spoiled, but neither is it as it should be. So creation groans – verse 22. One commentator says “Cosmic pessimism was rampant in the first century; most people believed that decay and Fate reigned supreme.” I’m not sure of the most popular outlook today, but Paul adds that even Christians who have been given the Holy Spirit share this groaning, looking for what they do not yet have or experience. What is that? Freedom from the present problems – so heaven, or perhaps the full experience of the Kingdom of God. It has started, but we still wait for its full realisation. We can’t make the Kingdom of God happen. It needs God, and his timing. So we wait, perhaps suffer, and hope.

But do we do that idly? No, at least I hope not.

  • We relish creation, enjoying it according to our gifts (taking pictures, easing relationships under strain, gardening) – and hope that helps others as well as us enjoy and glimpse the Creator.
  • We learn to give thanks, recognising the Creator, and our bounty.
  • We look forward. We talk about what we have now and what we are waiting for, keeping up our expectation with encouragement.
  • Where possible, we put things right. Fair Trade matters; it won’t solve all the problems of the world, but it will help, and fix some. Climate change matters, and yes, its a big issue – but find out what you can do, and do it.

Creation is wonderful; and we are waiting for our Creator God to make it as it is really supposed to be. In the meantime, we can still see some of his character in the creation, and we have things to hope for, and things to do.

Now?

The shops are full, the advertisements loud and demanding: Have it! Have it all! Now. The glitz has an appeal, but on reflection, it is profoundly depressing. Is this all there is? Nothing beyond what you can buy and break? For Christians, the run up to Christmas needs a different view. Not “Christmas already”, but another anticipation.

Paul explains in Romans 15:4-13. HOPE. Not a vague and wistful imagining, but a looking forward to what is promised. It is the by steadfastness, and the encouragement of the scriptures, that we find that essential ingredient of purposeful life, so often missing in our culture. This hope comes from God, who intends us ” to live in harmony with one another, in accordance with Christ Jesus” – which in itself is a blessing.

Hope, unlike so many consumer trophies, is something we can share, and share gladly. The story you know from Carol Services details creation, and human rebellion. But a loving God works patiently sending patriarchs, and prophets, looking to Christ, and then to his second coming. God has worked through the ages – he was the one explaining, preparing, looking forward in hope.

That may not be new, but remember it doesn’t stop! Scripture tells of the early Christians, looking forward in hope. They had not yet received all that had been promised. Which leaves us standing out; “Have it all, now?” No. THEN, yes. We are, still, people who look forward; who know that the promises are better than this, while enjoying what is good now, we wait expectantly for what will come.

Expectancy is important. In faith, in life, and in prayer. But especially in worship. If you expect very little – that is probably what you will get. If you are open to be reminded of God’s promises, to hear his plans and directions, to face your real needs – your hope of something good is likely to be well met.

Abraham ?

The letter to Hebrews (today we read Hebrews 11:1-3 and 11:8-16 or all of Hebrews 11:1-16) wants to explain “faith”, and so talks about Abraham. Here is a man of faith. Not faith as a dogmatic, stubborn, closed mind, living in an imaginary world. Abraham sets out on a journey because he trusts God, trusts that God has called him to travel. His faith is that trust – to go forward, take risks, (even to leave what he knows and follow God’s promise). Again, when promised a son by his wife Sarah, he trusts God, and the promise becomes a reality. It is through this faith, this trust, that he becomes such a key part of God’s story and the working out of God’s plan. He is remembered by 3 faiths: Christian, Jewish, Muslim.

Perhaps we need to look closely to see how this works, and might transfer to our lives and experience. It is not about blind obedience – Abraham doesn’t live by rules: do this, don’t do that. No, he lives close enough to God to hear, and when he hears, to have the confidence to obey, and see it work out.

That’s exciting, and a bit scary. But it seems to be where a good deal of Christian life is. Think about when you have needed God’s help, and received it. Think about what God is asking of you and of people around you now. It is not all clearly mapped out, there are risks – of getting it wrong, making mistakes, looking stupid (or worse). But there is also a chance to be a part of what God is doing!

Back to Abraham. He doesn’t see it all happen (we are talking c 1800BC!), but he sees God working, and looks forward, even beyond his lifetime. So, will you look forward and work for the future, or only back? Have you the faith to be on God’s journey, looking for the promises, and the reassurances of being on the right track? The gospel (Luke 12:32-40) paints a picture of some of the blessings given to those who travel that way. But we still have to set out, and keep going.