Tag Archives: values

Out of this world!

Where do you fit? Do you belong? It’s difficult if you feel you don’t. Yet Christians don’t entirely, and need to be at ease with that. Let me pick up some words from Jesus in today’s gospel (John 17:6-19)
John 17:6 “I have made you known to those you gave me out of the world”
and a few verses later
John 17:9 “I do not pray for the world ”
which is odd, not only because we do pray for the world and its needs, but that Jesus disciples were given out of the world.

Of course, we live in the world, have responsibilities in the world, encourage people to work for the good of their communities. But traditionally Christians have talked of not being “worldly” – not being formed by secular values, not being just followers of fashion, success, whatever everyone wants and is talking about. Jesus took his disciples, and taught them a way of life, a set of values – that would set them at odds with many in their communities. In John 17, as he prepares to leave them, he underlines that.

He says much the same a few verses later: John 17:15 “I do not ask you to take them out of the world, but I do ask you to keep them safe from the Evil One.”
John 17:16 “Just as I do not belong to the world, they do not belong to the world.”

Not belonging to the world, being kept safe from evil – these are still important. Still things to pray, for ourselves and others. It might help to look at Acts 1 (Acts 1:15-17 and Acts 1:21-26 are the readings this Sunday as well) also. The context is that funny time between Jesus leaving the disciples as he ascended to heaven, and the feast of Pentecost, when the Holy Spirit came to the believers, and equipped them for mission. In Acts 1, we hear of Judas fate (though it is left out of the recommended reading – don’t we like the warning it contains?) and of the choice of a replacement. Why did they need a replacement for Judas? Because the number 12 was important – 12 apostles in parallel with 12 tribes of Israel, becoming the new people of God, (not by race, or by “observance”, but by faith). You remember how Jacob was given the new name Israel, and his sons (well, including Joseph’s two sons) gave their names to the 12 tribes, each associated with a part of the Promised land? Well, now Jesus is re-making the people of God, with a new Covenant. But they are down to 11, so . .

What qualifications were required of any new candidate? That they had been with Jesus, and could be witnesses to his life, death and resurrection. (and they would also talk about the Holy Spirit once he arrived!).

That fits well. We are not to “belong” to the world. The early Christians are “growing out of” just being in Jewish religion. A new identity forms, a new people, but not a nation. For us, we live in a nation, and play a positive part in the community, but importantly are formed by the teaching of Jesus, and powered by the Holy Spirit he sent, rather than just by our own abilities, greed, or ambition. Our direction – our ambition – will seem strange to outsiders, because it isn’t just what we choose for ourselves.

Our fellowship will sometimes arouse envy, but many will not understand that it is more than good manners or common background, and comes from sharing an obedience to one Lord, and discipline in his service.

“out of this world” ? – not quite, but not belonging to it, –

belonging instead to one Lord, and one another. We have his mission to prioritise.

Correction !?

(There is a Dialogue Sketch on this gospel available at http://www.andrewknight.org.uk/dialogue-sketches/index-of-dialogue-sketches/matthew-1815-20-community-gossip-and-heaven/ )

Surprisingly, in a world where individualism reigns and everybody does their own thing, this is signing-up time. Students are committing to courses: school, college, or just evening classes and church housegroups.  Of course, many things you can do on your own: buy the book, manual, video and get on with it. But its easier with a real teacher and the fun of a group. Sometimes it helps when you are tempted to duck a wet evening in February to know that you will be missed. There is support and help in belonging.

So also in Church, but sometimes we damage that. When we don’t relate to other people, or do it badly, we weaken the encouragement, and make it harder for church to challenge or correct.  What! you say. You have no intention of being corrected? Well, read today’s gospel (Matthew 18:15-20) more carefully! Any community not only has values and rules, but ways of enforcing them.  They can be good or bad. Bad would include gossip, and arbitrary exclusion – being thrown out without warning or explanation. Good ways of enforcement might be – well, as in Mt – a careful proportionate response, with checks for truthfulness and the avoidance of kangaroo courts.

The Romans reading (Romans 13:8-14, especially verses 8 and 9) quotes Leviticus 19:18, and Jesus, about loving your neighbour as yourself. That is not just about being co-operative when they ask for help – lending tools over the back hedge. It is certainly much more that “doing anyone a good turn”. To love your neighbour is to have a real concern for their wellbeing, so if their life looks as if it might not be leading to heaven, you need to love your neighbour. It may be to say something to turn them again to God; it may be to point out what is happening in warning; or perhaps the only opportunity you have will be to give an example. The lesson from Ezekiel 33:7-11 sets out the responsibility, and not only for Old Testament prophets.

It’s signing-up time. Perhaps you will do some course, learning a language or skill. I certainly hope you will join in with a Church (and perhaps its groups!). One way and another we need to sign up to a congregation where we encourage one another on the way to heaven, and when necessary correct and warn one another of danger in the careful way Matthew lays out.

We have to love our neighbour, and to let them love us, for that is a central part of our faith. Loving our neighbour includes not letting them wander the road to hell without warning, or encouragement to take a better route.