Tag Archives: twelve

Out of this world!

Where do you fit? Do you belong? It’s difficult if you feel you don’t. Yet Christians don’t entirely, and need to be at ease with that. Let me pick up some words from Jesus in today’s gospel (John 17:6-19)
John 17:6 “I have made you known to those you gave me out of the world”
and a few verses later
John 17:9 “I do not pray for the world ”
which is odd, not only because we do pray for the world and its needs, but that Jesus disciples were given out of the world.

Of course, we live in the world, have responsibilities in the world, encourage people to work for the good of their communities. But traditionally Christians have talked of not being “worldly” – not being formed by secular values, not being just followers of fashion, success, whatever everyone wants and is talking about. Jesus took his disciples, and taught them a way of life, a set of values – that would set them at odds with many in their communities. In John 17, as he prepares to leave them, he underlines that.

He says much the same a few verses later: John 17:15 “I do not ask you to take them out of the world, but I do ask you to keep them safe from the Evil One.”
John 17:16 “Just as I do not belong to the world, they do not belong to the world.”

Not belonging to the world, being kept safe from evil – these are still important. Still things to pray, for ourselves and others. It might help to look at Acts 1 (Acts 1:15-17 and Acts 1:21-26 are the readings this Sunday as well) also. The context is that funny time between Jesus leaving the disciples as he ascended to heaven, and the feast of Pentecost, when the Holy Spirit came to the believers, and equipped them for mission. In Acts 1, we hear of Judas fate (though it is left out of the recommended reading – don’t we like the warning it contains?) and of the choice of a replacement. Why did they need a replacement for Judas? Because the number 12 was important – 12 apostles in parallel with 12 tribes of Israel, becoming the new people of God, (not by race, or by “observance”, but by faith). You remember how Jacob was given the new name Israel, and his sons (well, including Joseph’s two sons) gave their names to the 12 tribes, each associated with a part of the Promised land? Well, now Jesus is re-making the people of God, with a new Covenant. But they are down to 11, so . .

What qualifications were required of any new candidate? That they had been with Jesus, and could be witnesses to his life, death and resurrection. (and they would also talk about the Holy Spirit once he arrived!).

That fits well. We are not to “belong” to the world. The early Christians are “growing out of” just being in Jewish religion. A new identity forms, a new people, but not a nation. For us, we live in a nation, and play a positive part in the community, but importantly are formed by the teaching of Jesus, and powered by the Holy Spirit he sent, rather than just by our own abilities, greed, or ambition. Our direction – our ambition – will seem strange to outsiders, because it isn’t just what we choose for ourselves.

Our fellowship will sometimes arouse envy, but many will not understand that it is more than good manners or common background, and comes from sharing an obedience to one Lord, and discipline in his service.

“out of this world” ? – not quite, but not belonging to it, –

belonging instead to one Lord, and one another. We have his mission to prioritise.

A dark time

It’s a dark time.  Clouds are gathering and optimism in short supply.  As Jesus goes to Galilee, (Matthew 4:12-23) John the Baptist has been silenced, thrown into prison.  But there is prophecy of hope from as far back as Isaiah, and Jesus’ proclamation seems to be announcing something good.

Meanwhile, he is not going to work on his own.  First he calls Simon and Andrew, and then quickly also James and John.  It is not immediately clear how well they know Jesus, nor what they are letting themselves in for.  It seems to be enough that for the moment they will leave normal routine to follow and learn, taking instruction.  There is no contract.  This “discipleship” will take time to work out, but it is worth starting.

We know a little more of how things developed.  These four, with others, stayed as Jesus taught and healed.  Perhaps at first they sat and listened, but no doubt they began to help.  Was it organising those who wanted a private word first? or the practicalities of shopping for food or finding a bed for the night?  How long before they started to re-tell some of the favourite stories, to help people understand what Jesus was talking about?

We know that later, they were sent out in pairs. (Matthew 10:1-15)  Told, not just to preach, but to heal and exorcise people as well!  However they felt at first, they came back celebrating – and went on to learn some more.  There were all sorts of disciples, not just 12 men.  Luke tells us of 72 (Luke 10:1-20), and also speaks of how the women contributed to Jesus ministry too (Luke 8:1-3).  After the resurrection, the Acts of the Apostles explains how it was disciples who spread the message of Jesus.

They didn’t always get it right.  The whole of Paul’s letter to the Corinthians show an enthusiastic, but sometimes mistaken, church.  Early on (todays reading is from 1 Corinthians 1:10-18) we hear of dangerous divisions into groups and cliques.  Paul is clear that unity is important, and that Jesus is the leader, his death on the cross the vital answer to the need of messed up humans.

Disciples don’t become perfect – at least, not until they get to heaven.  But they do understand their need to learn.  Following Jesus goes on.  We learn more than stories to tell.  We become who we are meant to be, and being together is part of the process.  Some things have to go – competition, useless argument.  Some things come to show their value – Jesus, his choice of dying to serve, a future which brings light in the gloom.  Discipleship is still something to value, and keep doing.