Tag Archives: Proper 17a

Be Reasonable -?

“Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good”. That’s a nice sentiment; I can’t see anyone taking offence; it should be possible to weave a pleasant and encouraging sermon around those words. If only Paul stopped there, and we didn’t read on in Rom 12! – But of course he did write on, and we need to read the rest of Romans 12:9-21. As you do so, there are several possible reactions.

  • one is dismay, and then perhaps despair. It is one thing to celebrate love, but being patient in suffering (v12) is asking a bit, blessing those who persecute you (v14) is over the top, and overcoming evil with good (v21) is beyond.
  • another way of taking it would be to say, “Very nice, that’s the ideal, what’s the pass mark?” – in other words not to take it too seriously. Something nice to say, but don’t expect it to happen!
  • perhaps we should go a third way, taking these words very seriously:

This will highlight two very different understandings of what life might be about. Some will see Church as something they enjoy doing, and a chance to be reminded to do good. Others will see Church as a process of being transformed. On the first view, Paul’s words from Romans 12 are either a heavy burden, or something not to be taken too seriously. Only when you see Church – worship and study and service and fellowship – the whole – as part of a process in which God the Holy Spirit transforms us, can these words of Paul be a part of the good news. Then, far from bringing ever greater demands of our effort and performance, we have laid out a journey of wonder and delight.

Look at it this way with me for a minute.

Love must be completely sincere. Hate what is evil, hold on to what is good. 10 Love one another warmly as Christians, and be eager to show respect for one another.

Romans 12:9-10

This is what the early Christians were known for – and what we have not always managed to continue and repeat.

11 Work hard and do not be lazy. Serve the Lord with a heart full of devotion.

Romans 12:11

It needs zeal. Not to do the work, but to be an active partner, allowing it to happen, avoiding distractions, taking a keen interest in what the Holy Spirit is prompting us to do next.

12 Let your hope keep you joyful, be patient in your troubles, and pray at all times. 13 Share your belongings with your needy fellow Christians, and open your homes to strangers. 14 Ask God to bless those who persecute you—yes, ask him to bless, not to curse. 15 Be happy with those who are happy, weep with those who weep. 16 Have the same concern for everyone. Do not be proud, but accept humble duties.[a] Do not think of yourselves as wise.

Romans 12:12-16

This now begins to make sense as what God would do, and will do in us if he is allowed to take charge.

17 If someone has done you wrong, do not repay him with a wrong. Try to do what everyone considers to be good. 18 Do everything possible on your part to live in peace with everybody. 19 Never take revenge, my friends, but instead let God’s anger do it. For the scripture says, “I will take revenge, I will pay back, says the Lord.” 20 Instead, as the scripture says: “If your enemies are hungry, feed them; if they are thirsty, give them a drink; for by doing this you will make them burn with shame.”

Romans 12:17-20

Yes, of course this is demanding. But if we get into the habit of doing what the Holy Spirit suggests, we will be less concerned to defend ourselves. My feelings, my ego, my reputation – become less important as confidence in God, and investment in his Kingdom, grows.

Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.

Romans 12:21

Yes, it was the point of the Cross, and while we can never repeat that sacrifice, we can allow the principle to be applied in us, and we can share the victory. I suggest to you that Paul, and the Holy Spirit inspiring him, intended these words to be taken seriously, as a description of a life in which control is given to God the Holy Spirit. It is not a demand for ever greater self-control, but a progression as we learn more of the Christian life, and grow in confidence and practice.

Let love be genuine

Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.

Romans 12:9, 21

Must Jesus suffer?

As you read this post, do you count yourself as a Christian?  If so, “What do you do as a Christian?” only because you are a Christian, and would give up if you no longer claimed that faith?  You might need time to think about this – but if you cannot identify anything, does that throw doubt on your faith?  [If you do not describe yourself in this way, do you understand that to claim Christian faith should mean a real difference in ordinary life?].

A second question: “How do you do it?”.  Unwillingly, with a long face, or can you manage a positive sense of the privilege of discipleship, and the honour of service?

Today’s gospel (Matthew 16:21) says “Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and undergo great suffering at the hands of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised”.
He must.  It is clear in all 4 gospels, and the New Testament generally. The story works up to the cross. But Peter doesn’t get it – like many today. He sees Jesus as Messiah – King, and is looking forward (perhaps with some doubts) to celebrity, glory, winning. But God has very different ways, and the Messiah will win through suffering. Jesus tone makes it clear that is not negotiable, not a detail to be skimmed over.

I think we might all have some sympathy for Peter, and find it hard to keep in focus this strange way God chooses to work. Why does Jesus have to die? What good does it do?  Evangelical Christians will say firmly that He pays the price for our sin, and it is only by his death that we are free. That’s true, and if you haven’t come to terms with being in debt for your life, you need to do some thinking about it with God, and perhaps with 1 Peter 2 esp v24.

But be aware, too, that Jesus is unique, and all descriptions are metaphors which help us understand, but eventually no one picture covers all the angles. The New Testament does not give just one picture to explain, but many, to build up our understanding. So:

  • Jesus changes places with us 1 Peter 2 (esp v24)
  • Jesus is the sacrifice, the “Lamb of God” John 1
  • Jesus is the High Priest who offers a unique and effective sacrifice Hebrews 7, Hebrews 9
  • also the Pioneer Hebrews 2:10, Hebrews 12:2
  • and Jesus is Teacher (Matthew’s gospel has 5 collections of teaching, “new Law”, like a new Moses (see Deuteronomy 18).
  • this isn’t a full list, you can go on finding other pictures describing Jesus, his work and importance.

That is in danger of being confusing! Let’s summarise and say: It was no accident that Jesus suffered, died, and rose – it was all central to God’s plan to save us in love. The New Testament reflects on something very strange to our culture, assumptions, and ways of understanding, and offers a number of comparisons and pictures in explanation.

If you read another of today’s lessons (Romans 12:9-21), you will find the life described is reformed around Jesus – finding hope, patience, and love for enemies. This is the life which brings hope to Christians in Syria, Iraq, Egypt, Pakistan today. It is the same life which must characterise our learning to work together. I am sure there are those sitting at home today saying things like, “I don’t like going changing my habits, why can’t I have it the way I want it?” I think Peter would have had an answer, for the Christian must follow Christ and become like him. I think Jeremiah would have sympathised – he had a hard time (Jeremiah 15:15-21) – but also knew the discipline of obedience.

We follow a Lord whose Kingship was shown in the suffering of the Cross. We begin to see how God wins, in situations like yours and mine, in a way totally different to anything Hollywood, or the Islamic State, or Westminster can get their heads around. “Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and undergo great suffering” Peter, and the others who followed then and later (even now!), would have to learn Jesus way of winning, and see in it the glory of God’s love.