Tag Archives: Proper 11b

Oh heavens!

Have you ever thought that you might end up in heaven – and discover that you really didn’t like it there? (CS Lewis developed the idea in his book “The Great Divorce”). It’s not that I want to worry you, or cause nightmares, but it will certainly be very different!

The idea came to me as I thought about Ephesians 2:11-22. The question of Christians from Jewish and Gentile backgrounds doesn’t seem very important to us now. The Ephesians – like most of us – came to faith from various positions, but few were of Jewish family. Paul is quite definite about there now being just one family and household of faith, which might seem uncontroversial.

Until you think about what it will be like to experience family life with all sorts of other Christians. How will you take to South American Pentecostals, or Asian members of ancient churches, or first nation people, or . . In heaven we shall be brought to understand that the God who has brought us together is greater and more precious than any of our distinctive traditions, or the families we come from, the lives we have lead . .

So, it may be all right in heaven, but perhaps we should start preparing now? After all, if we can think about what really matters and lasts for eternity, and what is going to be left behind, would it not smooth the transition? Or do we find that we are too attached to some temporary things, and want to say that they are really much more important than – well, than God might think?

Be a blessing!

[many will be remembering Mary Magdalene, rather than using the Proper 11b readings this weekend, but for Mark 6:30ff . .]

Look at Mark telling us of Jesus popularity! (Mark 6:30-34 & 53-56). People wanted to see him and be with him; he was ready to teach them, and they to listen. There was healing, too. No doubt they talked most readily of losing illnesses and disabilities – but there must have been repaired relationships, and redirected lives, as well.

So why is it that Jesus later loses some of this, and today’s church is not hailed as a great place to enjoy, to learn, and to find wholeness?  The gospel will explain how opposition to Jesus developed into a plot to kill him, but I wonder if we fail to take seriously our call to be a blessing?  We are given so much, and – yes – chosen by God. What for? Because we are superior to others? Don’t fool yourself – there are many who work harder, deserve more, have greater potential.

We are given faith, to share and be a blessing. We are meant to be built into a living Church – always difficult because if involves personalities – a Church to set about God’s plans for our local community and its people. Welcome is not a Public Relations necessity for “successful” churches – it is part of faith!

When it works, it is lovely – the picture of people gladly welcoming Jesus, and enjoying the healing he brings, is not outdated. It remains difficult, because we so easily want to be “better”, because we find it so hard to be a blessing, and sometimes find it hard to see how to safeguard that from those who might spoil it.

The answer is not theoretical, but a commitment to follow Jesus. I don’t know fully what he wants me to do, but I’ll make a start on what I know. I don’t know how it will all work out, but I will trust that it does, and see hope and joy in that, better than any alternative.