Tag Archives: miracles

Together round – a Cross?

How do you feel about people whose idea of a day out is to visit the Chamber of horrors? Do you really want to know the technical details of gas chambers, electric chairs or guillotines? No? I find that encouraging. But why do Christians meet around a CROSS? People generally find “Christ crucified” a strange message, let alone Good News (we are reading 1 Corinthians 1:18-25 ).

If God wanted to sort out the world, why not do it? We can’t explain God, but perhaps he could have abolished the troublesome human race, or just taken away our freedom to do evil? This would not be our preference, so what can God do to avoid wasting the lot of us, yet sort out the mess?

The answer is – the Cross.    And it is Good News, however odd, because it is about Victory over: Death, Evil, Temptation, plotting enemies, Failed friends, [Helplessness, despair, insignificance]. In fact everything we need to beat, because the Cross is the cross – a painful death by torture. It is about a depth of commitment (God’s), about not crushing the weak or the despairing, and about sharing in the worst of earthly life. It is NOT about personal success, or pretending. It has nothing to do with “image” or “status”. In fact the opposite, it is a constant reminder that left to ourselves, we invent methods of torture.

So what’s the problem? God isn’t playing the games people like to play. The Jews (verse 22; and many others) wanted miracles – let God do something dramatic to catch attention and entertain. The Cross is dramatic, but not entertaining; its too painful, not just for the victim. It doesn’t flatter us. The Greeks (verse 22) and many like them want wisdom.    They liked to debate, and wanted to find truth in assertions of human dignity, in the heroic potential of the human spirit. The Cross tells us of humanity in such a dangerous mess that they couldn’t help themselves, and needed to be rescued.

The Church in Corinth wasn’t rich, didn’t have any geniuses; they were people others liked to make fun of, and God chose to use to show his power.    That’s the problem, as Christians we are people of the Cross, we can’t say how wonderful we are, but verse 31.

“Let the one who boasts boast in the Lord.”

1 Corinthians 1:31

So I hope you understand why the Cross is much more than a symbol, and stands as a summary of Christian faith. Faith which is Good News, because God doesn’t sort out the world by wasting us when we fail to meet his standards, but chooses instead the difficult and painful way of suffering the worst to offer us the best, and leaves us a reminder that shows the depth of his commitment, the greatness of his victory, and the depths to which we fall if we choose to go it alone.

Natural development – and more

While much of the world has moved from Christmas back to work and dreams of holidays, Christians have, I hope, more to ask. “How did people get to know about Jesus?”, What was the route from “Baby of Bethlehem” to “Saviour of the World”? Perhaps by mapping it out, week by week, we can learn, and apply it for our own faith, and for our sharing faith with other people.

It starts at the Epiphany with the visit of the Wise Men, then goes on to Jesus’ baptism. But Luke 3:15-22 doesn’t say much about the baptism. Why? he was not interested in details (which day, time, how wet, exactly where . .). Luke wants us to understand that (verse 22) the Holy Spirit came down on Jesus; John the Baptist had said (verse 16) “He will baptise you with the Holy Spirit and fire.” Now Jesus is baptised, and the Spirit descends on him, as a vital preparation for his ministry. (So in Acts 8:16,17, also read this Sunday, Peter and John expect Christians to receive the Holy Spirit for their Christian life.)

Some versions of faith make the most of the natural. Scripture records God the creator, and expects us to receive and use our “natural” / God given general abilities. There is advice (even commands) about learning, manners, “self development” – some of the things we don’t like: discipline, diligence. – look in the Wisdom tradition, Proverbs, but also eg Ruth. Loyalty, the providence of God (and hard work) feature more than miracles.

Luke is not dismissing or denying that. But he wants to make very clear that Christian life combines both the natural and the supernatural. The Holy Spirit who empowered Jesus is also to give us strength and direction, gifts and fruit.

The story of Jesus will tell of God rescuing us from sin and chaos. But Luke won’t stop there. He will also make clear, from the beginning, the way that humans might join in God’s work. The Holy Spirit is important in both, for the Holy Spirit who descended on Jesus at his baptism was the same Holy Spirit received by the believers Peter and John prayed for – the same Holy Spirit Christians pray for.

Jesus baptism wasn’t important to Luke because of its ritual, but because of the arrival of the Spirit and the beginning of the Ministry. The two go together. As we begin to ask “How did people get to know about Jesus?” The most important part of the answer, then and now, was the role played by the Holy Spirit. We mustn’t neglect our “natural” abilities and skills, but as Christians we need to use them with the power and direction of the Holy Spirit to be fully effective in responding to God’s love by living in his service.