Tag Archives: gossip

Proper Waiting

Waiting comes in different forms. We wait for good news, or for bad news, hoping it won’t come but half expecting it will. All waiting can do strange things to the way we live:

  • ordinary things sometimes lose importance
  • or some things get more important
  • we may do “displacement activity”, busy with irrelevant things
  • we may do nothing – and just “freeze”

When Paul writes 2 Thessalonians 3:6-13, he reminds the Christians in Thessalonica that he had told them of Jesus return as King. It was, and is, an important part of faith. It should be reflected in a proper way of life, not fully absorbed in what is now, and the way people do things now. We sometimes talk about a pilgrimage, us on a journey, with the idea of “passing through”. But we easily forget that really we’re waiting for someone else, and we can’t hurry the journey along.

Of course, someone always gets the wrong idea. Some Thessalonians heard Paul, and gave up work. What was the point if Jesus was coming back? So not only did they sponge on other people for food and necessities, in their idleness they started gossiping, giving the whole community a bad reputation. Paul is not having that. He had worked – not that he might not have claimed support, but he worked to give them an example.

This is not suggesting that the unemployed should starve! It is a reminder that Christians should be usefully occupied. All Christians. If you have to work for a living, good. Do it well, and make the most of those contacts you make to witness to your faith in Jesus. Not easy? Try to find help, and learn ways to do it properly – without bullying. Students, don’t waste that course! You have a responsibility there. If you don’t have to work for a living, or can’t get a job at the moment, good. Give thanks for your freedom, but don’t imagine you needn’t account for your use of time and energy! There is a lot to be done, in family & community.

Everybody, avoid gossip, and idle chatter which leads to general (and proper) criticism. There is a story (was it of John Wesley?), who was asked what he would do if he knew Jesus was coming back tomorrow. He took out his diary, checked his engagements, and said yes, that was what he’d do. We are all meant to live, to be ready for Jesus to come, but also to carry on as long as necessary. It’s all part of our understanding of God’s Kingdom:

  • on the one hand Jesus will come back, so don’t get too used to the way things are; don’t imagine that what everybody else does must be right
  • but don’t get so focussed on the future that you don’t do a good job of work (paid or voluntary!), or forget to help people now

Christian faith is never to be an excuse for not doing what needs to be done on earth now. But we always live knowing that what is on earth now is not as important as what will be at the end.

Correction !?

(There is a Dialogue Sketch on this gospel available at http://www.andrewknight.org.uk/dialogue-sketches/index-of-dialogue-sketches/matthew-1815-20-community-gossip-and-heaven/ )

Surprisingly, in a world where individualism reigns and everybody does their own thing, this is signing-up time. Students are committing to courses: school, college, or just evening classes and church housegroups.  Of course, many things you can do on your own: buy the book, manual, video and get on with it. But its easier with a real teacher and the fun of a group. Sometimes it helps when you are tempted to duck a wet evening in February to know that you will be missed. There is support and help in belonging.

So also in Church, but sometimes we damage that. When we don’t relate to other people, or do it badly, we weaken the encouragement, and make it harder for church to challenge or correct.  What! you say. You have no intention of being corrected? Well, read today’s gospel (Matthew 18:15-20) more carefully! Any community not only has values and rules, but ways of enforcing them.  They can be good or bad. Bad would include gossip, and arbitrary exclusion – being thrown out without warning or explanation. Good ways of enforcement might be – well, as in Mt – a careful proportionate response, with checks for truthfulness and the avoidance of kangaroo courts.

The Romans reading (Romans 13:8-14, especially verses 8 and 9) quotes Leviticus 19:18, and Jesus, about loving your neighbour as yourself. That is not just about being co-operative when they ask for help – lending tools over the back hedge. It is certainly much more that “doing anyone a good turn”. To love your neighbour is to have a real concern for their wellbeing, so if their life looks as if it might not be leading to heaven, you need to love your neighbour. It may be to say something to turn them again to God; it may be to point out what is happening in warning; or perhaps the only opportunity you have will be to give an example. The lesson from Ezekiel 33:7-11 sets out the responsibility, and not only for Old Testament prophets.

It’s signing-up time. Perhaps you will do some course, learning a language or skill. I certainly hope you will join in with a Church (and perhaps its groups!). One way and another we need to sign up to a congregation where we encourage one another on the way to heaven, and when necessary correct and warn one another of danger in the careful way Matthew lays out.

We have to love our neighbour, and to let them love us, for that is a central part of our faith. Loving our neighbour includes not letting them wander the road to hell without warning, or encouragement to take a better route.