Tag Archives: ecology

Creation, and Redemption

Creation Sunday – the second before Lent – takes us to Colossians 1:15-20. This is important, not just for what it says, (which is quite a lot!), but also for what it brings together. Some will want to focus on Redemption, looking at verse 20 and being reminded of the importance of Jesus death in our reconciliation with God. This is “core gospel”, always something to value, delight in, and pass on in worship and conversation.

But let me also point out what else is said. Verse 15 explains that Jesus shows us what God is like. After all the arguments about how God is greater than our minds can understand, arguments which are true, we can see as much as we can understand in the Son of God, living as the human Jesus.

Almost before we can hear that, verse 16 insists that the Son of God has a role in Creation. There is a significant detail, “all things have been created through him and for him“. (my italics). Creation remains important for our Redeemer. Creation is not just a prologue, a necessary introduction before the real story begins. It is part of God’s whole purpose and plan.

When we think about this, other details begin to attract our attention. If we go back to verse 20 where we started, we notice that the reconciliation the Son achieves is not only for humans. “through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven,”. All things – more than people. Exactly how that works is beyond me, but it convinces me that Christian life can never be limited to a concern with Redemption (ours and other people’s) but extends to a care for Creation. We have good news about our Saviour, and we must encourage all who will to be good news for the health of our planet. Not either / or, but both and.

There is no shortage of organisations to help us with a Christian concern for the environment (A Rocha and EcoChurch come to mind, but many mission and relief agencies are becoming more aware of environmental casualties, as well as their own impact). What is more worrying is the apparent division between Christians who take this seriously as part of their faith, and those who see it strictly as an optional enthusiasm. This reading in Colossians makes clear that Creation and Redemption are both part of God’s plan, both demand attention and action, both are at the heart of the faith we need to practise. It’s not the only text on this subject, but let’s start here.

Creation matters

You might wonder why Christians bother with thoughts of Creation. If so, it may help to think about alternatives to the story we have heard (in Genesis 2:4b-9 and 15-25):

  • many now seem to think the universe is an accident explained by science. It has no purpose, people have no significance, and there is no basis for love or justice unless we pretend to find one.
  • Others don’t care about causes. They just believe that “Might is Right”, and what matters is to be on top of the pile, not the bottom
  • and some think that if there is Fate or god, it is no friend, and may even be out to catch them our or get them!

So: part of the Good News we have to share is about God, who in love creates. Though we have done some damage, the universe was well and beautifully made. It shows God to be wise, powerful, and to understand and plan in ways quite beyond our little minds!

Of course, there is an element of threat in this. It means this is not my world – it does not revolve around me, my wants, my ambitions . . God the creator owns it all. Even “my” possessions. Even “my” life. That makes quite a difference to the way we see things. You may notice in John’s vision of heaven, Revelation 4, that it is not all about family reunions and eternal holiday – the throne of God is central, and worship is what is happening.

Similarly, the God who chooses to make man and woman in his own image dignifies every human – even the poor, disabled, refugee, handicapped, criminal . . It is not for us to change his priorities.

So I hope you are beginning to see that Creation – the Christian understanding of a God of power and love who chooses to make us and our surroundings – is important. We have to come to terms with not being in control, with not having owner’s rights. Yet, this is Good News, just as the disciples in the boat that stormy day (Luke 8:2-25) discovered it was wonderful to be with Jesus, who understood their panic, and was able to put things right. Just as Adam and Eve found out, when even after their rebellion (Genesis 3: “We don’t have to be told what to do by Him!”) God acts in love to provide first, clothing, and a future salvation.

Belief in a Creator God does not mean we don’t have to bother about the way we treat the Earth and leave it for future generations. The knowledge that we are managers, or stewards – of the universe, as well as our lives and possessions – puts us in a good place. We have a responsible job, and excellent support!