Tag Archives: Easter 3a

In hard times

What do you say to someone having a hard time? Perhaps feeling isolated, threatened, and bruised. One answer is found in 1 Peter, which we are going to follow through the lectionary readings for the next few weeks. It offers a commentary on the significance of the resurrection.

So what do you say? We’ll look at todays reading – 1 Peter 1:17-23. Start with that first verse: “live in reverent fear during the time of your exile” – not perhaps the sort of encouragement we would expect, but follow it through.

“Exile”. Not literally – the letter (see 1:1) is not to refugees, nor to Jews living outside Palestine, but to Gentile Christians living, as Abraham had done, as one passing through the world on the way to heaven. It may be that these Christians felt the social exclusion shared by some Christian young people – because they were different. Peter encourages them to be different, for a reason.

“you know that you were ransomed”

1 Peter 1:18

I hope you do, too! Ransomed is a word we understand from kidnapping and the taking of hostages. But we can be more precise. Ransomed from v18 “futile ways inherited from your ancestors”.

We can all look back at wasted time – and perhaps worse – when we did not offer a service as effective as we should have to God. That is what we were – and are being – saved from.

Ransomed by v18b not valuables, but the sacrifice of Christ. No detail here of how, but a reminder of the real cost. Also v20 “for your sake” – this becomes personal. Yes, in Passiontide we think about the suffering of Jesus, and in Easter of the joy of his Resurrection. But when we put those together, we see that the implications of the Resurrection are more significant because of their cost.

Which brings us, knowing what we are Ransomed from, and what we are Ransomed by, to what we are Ransomed to v21 to trust in God “so that your faith and hope are set on God” Peter will return several times to talk about holiness of life. About the need for Christians to take on board what has been done for them, and then to live the life. Now he speaks of obedience to the truth, and love. v22

New birth is a new status, but more important the start of a new life, which, unlike the futility described in v18, is to last and grow into something valuable, serviceable, and eternal

What do you say to someone having a hard time? Most of us try things like, hope it gets better soon. Peter takes a rather deeper line. Remember who you are, what your ransom cost, then take full advantage and live it to the full.

Unrecognised

It is surprising how often Jesus is not recognised.  Today’s story of a walk with a “stranger” (Luke 24:13-35) is an example.  The resurrected Jesus is the same, but not immediately known.  There is time for talk on the road, and Jesus listens.  It is a good school of evangelism.  As he listens, he discovers what these two travellers had hoped for, expected, and felt about events as they had unfolded.  He gets an insight into their disappointment and confusion.

Then – only then – “he interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures” (v27).  I wonder how long a list you could write of the Old Testament passages which tell us something about Jesus?  We may not see them as “proofs”, for there is always discussion about how they were originally understood, but there is plenty to guide and encourage us.

I suppose the biggest references would be to the “Suffering Servant” in Isaiah, especially Isaiah 53.  A pointer to how suffering might set people free!  With the Servant, and joined totally, is the King, the Messiah expected to succeed to King David’s legacy.  For that we might look to the Jeremiah 33:17f, as well as to the gospels.  The idea of the Servant King, whose glory is at the cross, will explain a great deal to us of who Jesus was, and what he did.

Is that it?  I think there were many more references Jesus could have picked up.  His favourite title, “Son of Man” has a meaningful background in Daniel 7, as a figure empowered by God.  Then there is the expectation of a “prophet like Moses” in Deuteronomy 18.  Earlier in Isaiah are the passages we typically read at Christmastime – the descendant of Jesse (King David’s father) bringing peace (Isaiah 11), but also Emmanuel – “God with us” (Isaiah 7.14).  The one who brings light to Galilee, and is “Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9).  Perhaps Jesus talked of the donkey-riding King of Zechariah 9, or the prophesied birth in Bethlehem (Micah 5:2).  There are more you could look for.

These are useful references in Eastertime.  They may not “prove” anything, but they make us think more deeply, and help us understand how much history came to a climax and fulfillment at Jesus death.  He was so many things, fulfilled such varied hopes and expectations.  Faith can wear thin if we only explain in one way, endlessly repeated.  Jesus then remains unrecognised as the one for us.  That is a disaster!  God has provided many dimensions to wonder at, and a Lord with a heritage worth deeper exploration and greater appreciation.