Tag Archives: contentment

All Talk.

There’s an awful lot of talk. Even if we are relatively alone, the chatter of the older, broadcast media is now amplified by social media. Sadly, a great deal of it is bad tempered and complaining, even abusive. Christian communities ought to be better, kinder – but the theory is by no means always realised.

When Paul says (in 2 Corinthians 4:13-5:1) “I believed; therefore I have spoken”, he takes this further. The Holy Spirit reminds us that the grace we have received should lead us to speak in thanksgiving and praise. It is not something we are good at! (Well, I speak for myself, you may make your own assessment of those among whom you live and worship). Embarrassment at being thought “pious” – or just “odd” – tends to keep us to the social norm.

That social norm tends to grumbling and complaint. Of course the sun doesn’t always shine, and there are always some people who really face crisis, pain and trauma. But it is all too easy to concentrate on the negative, compare our lives with those who have more, and not less, and feel hard done by. Paul urges us to get a sense of proportion. What we experience now – including the problems: physical, mental and spiritual – is temporary, as we move on to the good things God has prepared.

So, what shall we talk about? Can we re-educate ourselves, not to a false and unnatural pretence, but to a focus on the goodness of what God gives, now and in the future? Can we make ourselves more available to those who suffer by being content in our own situation? Can we be witnesses to grace in our present time and place?

Mary Magdalene

[Mary Magdalene is traditionally remembered on 22 July, so many churches will replace the routine readings this Sunday to turn to her story]

The “Saints” in New Testament language are defined as all faithful Christians.  Still, we often use the term for those best known, perhaps for their place in the New Testament. These have a place in our education, as examples of the grace and work of Christ in believers, and of the diversity of vocation. They also challenge our limited horizons:
to those inclined to say “This is me, this is all I am ever going to be, and all I want from religion is a bit of comfort” they offer a resounding “NO” This may be where you now start, but by God’s grace you will grow into His purposes, as they did.

Mary Magdalene was “rubbish”: a woman, and one possessed by demons until Jesus freed her (Luke 8:2)! Yet she is remarkably honoured:

  •  she is mentioned as one of the group of women who followed Jesus. Indeed, it may be significant that she is usually mentioned first.
  • she is granted the first appearance of the Resurrected Jesus (John 20), and is the “apostle to the apostles”{a medieval term from several theologians}, sent to tell them the good news
  • she has a clear place in the gospel story – not bad for a nobody (and good reason for us to revise our ideas of who “matters”!)

But be careful not to get her story wrong. Dan Brown in the da Vinci Code took ideas from the Gnostics, (and their late and untrustworthy writings, the “Gospels” of Thomas and of Mary) that she was Jesus’ lover or wife, mother of his child/children, teacher of the apostles. Wishful thinking? Inability to believe that a close relationship could not be pure? Ben Witherington notes there is NO early historical evidence that Mary’s relationship with Jesus was anything other than disciple to Master/teacher.

But let’s go back to what we know with confidence, and ask “Why, or in what way, is her life an example for us?”

  • Firstly, she accepts what God does for her. Healing, change, becoming part of a new group (and no doubt adapting to it).
  • Secondly, she re-makes her life around God’s purposes. We can only speculate about her life before: did she have family (or had they given up?) Certainly she recognises the source of her healing, and she follows. A very important part of Christian life is finding where God wants to put us, and being content to work at fitting there.
  • Thirdly and very importantly, she invites us to look again at the way Jesus relates to people. He has funny ideas about who is important. He avoids making people dependant, yet is of first importance – to beggar, scholar, and fisherman.

Saints are useful to make us think of what God does, and wants to do, with his people. We need to be careful not to read into their stories what we want to find, but there is plenty here to instruct and challenge us.