Money (Pentecost 19c, Proper 21c)

What is money for?  It’s strange how, in a materialistic culture, we don’t ask the question.  An Economist would probably give an answer about the convenience of avoiding barter for all transactions – true, but not entirely helpful.

Looking at Luke 16:19-31, or indeed remembering Jesus’ disciple Matthew the Tax collector, we do at least see some ways of getting it wrong.  The rich man of the parable found that his wealth meant he didn’t have to think about other people, and got into the habit of seeing the poor as available to run errands for his convenience.  Matthew left a career in the financial sector (well, I suppose that is how we would describe it now -?) for the uncertainties of travelling with and learning from Jesus.

If we try to ask what Jesus taught about money, it is not quite straightforward.  While one rich young man was told to get rid of his wealth and follow (Mark 10:17-23), that was not true of all his followers.  Some came from the families of tradespeople (the fishermen, for example, left their father in the boat with the hired men – Mark 1:20), some like Nicodemus, Joseph of Arimathea, and the women who funded Jesus ministry, clearly had wealth.

At the same time, there is no encouragement to see wealth linked to status.  There are warnings in this story against letting wealth get in the way of relationships (compare James 2:1-10).  I think it would be fair to say that having money – even at the average of British life – gives added responsibility (in using it as God’s managers), and added temptations (to misuse it).  Given that we in the west are wealthy, why is it that we so seldom ask what money is for, and how we might judge our use of it, and what are the good and bad models?

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